Walking at Work – Week 10

Lots of patterns, attempts at black and white, urban decay, and lots of shadows. cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward

“Unlearning”

I have always been rather irritated1 by the quote attributed to Alvin Toeffler. It was used in the start of the History and Future of (Mostly) Higher Education MOOC. The participants are all supposed to be life long unlearners. Cute, pithy, tweetable but I fundamentally disagree with what the words mean. First, the quote- The illiterate of the 21st century will not be those who cannot read and write, but those who cannot learn, unlearn, and relearn. I went wandering to find more about Toeffler and the quote. Know thy enemy2 and all that. The book most often associated with the quote is Future Shock. I find only two uses of the word “illiterate” in Future Shock. I also found a full PDF copy online that returned the same information. I won’t link to it here but you could find it without much issue. I’m amazed what I find by adding filetype:pdf to my Google searches. Anyway, the quote below seems to be the relevant one and it turns out I’m not the first to wander down this path. He does quote Gerjuoy who says something close, but better and harder to quote. Psychologist Herbert Gerjuoy of the Human Resources Research Organization phrases it simply: “The new education must teach the individual how to classify and reclassify information, how to […]

Chi Alignment Workflow Dump

And by chi, obviously I mean chi. Consider this an attempt to clear my head a bit. Bouncing off Jim’s post . . . I decided to look at smoothing off the rough edges of some new elements of my viewing/reading/sharing workflows. Flickr Addition One chunk I hadn’t been happy with but had never fixed was the images from people I follow on Flickr. I glanced at them when I logged in but that was it. I’ve been following more people lately including Alexander Pini1 so I wanted to set that up better. Given I had the full feed of the Flickr Commons in Feedly I figured I’d add this as well. When I didn’t see any obvious RSS icons I flipped into the source code and saw the image below which made me pretty happy- a nice Flickr Easter egg. In any case, the URL is in there as well and it’d probably get picked up automatically but . . . hey maybe that wouldn’t happen sometime and it’s worth remembering you can flip over to source and do a find (ctrl+F or command+F)2 for RSS. Tumblr Dashboard Irritation cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward I’m looking at ways to pull in my Tumblr dashboard but haven’t been thrilled with my options. RSS […]

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Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

The British amateur who debunked the mathematics of happiness | Science | The Observer “”The answer,” says Brown when I meet him in a north London cafe, “is because that’s how it always happens. Look at whistleblower culture. If you want to be a whistleblower you have to be prepared to lose your job. I’m able to do what I’m doing here because I’m nobody. I don’t have to keep any academics happy. I don’t have to think about the possible consequences of my actions for people I might admire personally who may have based their work on this and they end up looking silly. There are 160,000 psychologists in America and they’ve got mortgages. I’ve got the necessary degree of total independence.” “ tags: research weekly freedom truth lies psychology happiness math numbers data Do what you love, love what you do: An omnipresent mantra that’s bad for work and workers. “DWYL is a secret handshake of the privileged and a worldview that disguises its elitism as noble self-betterment. According to this way of thinking, labor is not something one does for compensation but is an act of love. If profit doesn’t happen to follow, presumably it is because the worker’s passion and determination were insufficient. Its real achievement is making workers believe their labor serves the self and […]

Walking at Work – Week 9

cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward I liked the mix of organic cobblestones and the regularity of the bricks as made more evident by the snow. cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward I’d taken this shot before with the lensbaby but wanted to try again with the 50mm. cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward For the pure oddness of it. cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward I’m going to be attempting some black and white shots in the future after seeing every one of these photos. It is going to require quite a bit of different thinking. cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward The kestrel as it might have been named by Marianne Moore. There’s a whole car/bike word project you could do that would be a lot of fun. Trying to take advantage of the snow1 cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA […]

Museum Remixes

After seeing Alan’s post . . . This is a response to the Tate’s call for their 1840s GIF party — they have made images available from selected pieces of art from their 1840s room and inviting anyone to remix as a GIF. That is such a good idea I made it into a ds106 assignment. It is interesting to see how museums and libraries are using social media in fairly different ways. I’d been impressed with Iowa’s Special Collections Tumblr and this idea by the Tate is certainly something you wouldn’t expect from a museum. In any case, I gave the gif thing a shot (subtle and not so subtle versions). My wife had The Lady of Shalott poster for a number of years so I’d seen it many times but in the gif reshaping I saw all sorts of interesting things in the painting that I’d never noticed. I’d missed the swallows1, the chain in her hand, and the crucifix in the prow. That led to some light research and, as always, some new knowledge. 1 I didn’t know what they were but guessed mockingbirds originally.

Blackwood’s 1872

cc licensed ( ) flickr photo shared by National Library of Ireland… I saw this photo on the National Library of Ireland’s Commons stream. I loved it for a variety of reasons and eventually decided I’d like to have a real copy for my office. Unfortunately, the largest version on Flickr was 1768 x 1937. I wrote in the Flickr comments asking about a larger version but there was no response after a few days so I followed up with the contact information from their website. That led to some correspondence and I took a gamble buying a digital copy for 7 Euros (about $10). Pixel dimensions were unknown but it was TIFF and 600dpi. At worst, I made a donation to the National Library of Ireland. I’ve been playing around with that TIFF file and seeing what I could do with Image Trace in Adobe Illustrator. It’s pretty impressive what it can do. I’ve jacked up the size considerably and will be curious to see what it looks like printed in large format. cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward You can see some of the difference that comes from upping the number of angles in the trace below. All things considered the whole scenario is amazing. I can randomly come across photographs from […]

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Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

New perspectives – what’s wrong with TED talks? Benjamin Bratton at TEDxSanDiego 2013 – Re:Think – YouTube tags: ted talks complexity weekly We Didn’t Eat the Marshmallow. The Marshmallow Ate Us. – NYTimes.com “The marshmallow study captured the public imagination because it is a funny story, easily told, that appears to reduce the complex social and psychological question of why some people succeed in life to a simple, if ancient, formulation: Character is destiny. Except that in this case, the formulation isn’t coming from the Greek philosopher Heraclitus or from a minister preaching that “patience is a virtue” but from science, that most modern of popular religions.” tags: black white true false weekly marshmallow simple complex veltman/principles “Cool URLs don’t change.” “Assume that people won’t read the instructions.” tags: webdesign principals web design weekly How Did Toast Become the Latest Artisanal Food Craze? – Pacific Standard: The Science of Society tags: toast food artisanal weekly “Language is fossil poetry” – Ralph Waldo Emerson h/t @gardnercampbell “The etymologist finds the deadest word to have been once a brilliant picture. Language is fossil poetry. As the limestone of the continent consists of infinite masses of the shells of animalcules, so language is made up of images or tropes, which now, in their secondary use, have long ceased to remind us of their […]

Walking at Work Week 8

This is my second week using the Lens Baby Composer (old version). It’s different than my typical lens in that it requires manual focus and, of course, has the ability to bend in ways that result in some interesting visual effects.

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Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

NC State News :: NC State News and Information » Study Shows ‘Readability’ Scores Are Largely Inaccurate “Teachers, parents and textbook companies use technical “readability” formulas to determine how difficult reading materials are and to set reading levels by age group. But new research from North Carolina State University shows that the readability formulas are usually inaccurate and offer little insight into which age groups will be able to read and understand a text. ” Study Shows ‘Readability’ Scores Are Largely Inaccurate “Teachers, parents and textbook companies use technical… http://t.co/hlLBsk886g — Tom Woodward (@twoodwar) January 11, 2014 tags: IFTTT Twitter reading scores data weekly tweet 2014 Olympic Freestyle Uniforms – snow camo to mask movement from judges “One of the coolest innovations has to be the snow camo. Mogul skiers are judged by their amount of body movement while going through the course. With a unique pattern for each country, the hope is the snow camo will help mask some of the unwanted movement.  “ tags: freestyle uniforms moguls technology camo judges olympics weekly tweet Scarlet Song | I like the result but the real interesting portion is the description of the process. tags: transmedia art photography process artist photo weekly © 2008 Gary S. Stager “I have strong reservations about both grades and rubrics. I believe that both practices […]