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Citation Workflow – Diigo/Pinterest to Google SS

Talking to Bud the other day he mentioned that generating the citation page for his digital stories was something of a pain. I’ve thought about it a bit since then and decided to try to simplify a workflow for this. Odd thing I learned – – CHAR(10) is the official way to get line breaks in Google Spreadsheet formulas. Flickr to Diigo to Google Spreadsheets Initially, I looked at the Flickr galleries because that’s the option that Bud normally uses. I saw that the gallery was in a standard HTML list format and I had some hope. Google spreadsheets lets you pull lists and tables like these in via the IMPORTHTML function. Martin Hawksey has some good instructions and examples over here. So that failed but I could import just about every other list on the page. So, I decided doing this through Diigo would make pretty decent sense for a number of people. Assuming you choose a unique tag for the images you plan to use- this example just uses “flickr”, I’d suggest something story/movie specific. So the basic Diigo URL you’d get is https://www.diigo.com/user/bionicteaching/flickr. Trying to make this really easy for people, I set up the first page to allow you to paste that URL in and our friendly formulas transform it into https://www.diigo.com/rss/user/bionicteaching/flickr. The example linked here […]

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Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

Lost in the Meritocracy – Walter Kirn – The Atlantic “I enrolled the next fall, but with no intention of staying. I’d read my Fitzgerald, and I wanted to go east; I wanted to ride the train to the last station. As a natural-born child of the meritocracy, I’d been amassing momentum my whole life, entering spelling bees, vying for forensics medals, running my mouth in mock United Nations meetings and model state governments and student congresses, and I knew only one direction: forward, onward. I lived for prizes, praise, distinctions, and I gave no thought to any goal higher or broader than my next report card. Learning was secondary; promotion was primary. No one had ever told me what the point was, except to keep on accumulating points, and this struck me as sufficient. What else was there?” Lost in the Meritocracy – #thoughtvectors “I enrolled the next fall, but with no intention of staying. I’d r… http://t.co/dkzBFCC1Gr — Tom Woodward (@twoodwar) March 28, 2014 tags: IFTTT Twitter weekly thoughtvectors education learning tweet even unbidden privileges must be paid for. With no stored literary material about which to harbor critical assumptions, I relied on my gift for mimicking authority figures and playing back to them their own ideas disguised as conclusions that I’d reached myself. The deployment of key […]

Flickr Photos by Year/Month

I was looking around to see how many pictures I’ve been posting to Flickr since taking the new job at VCU. I had a feeling there was a dramatic increase but I was curious about actual numbers. After stumbling around the Internet for a bit attempting to do things the hard way, I stumbled on a URL from 2004 — https://www.flickr.com/photos/heather/archives/date-posted/2004/06/calendar/ It didn’t seem to be working but since the URL itself made sense, I just replaced heather with my flickr username and put in the current year/month to get https://www.flickr.com/photos/bionicteaching/archives/date-posted/2013/04/calendar/. Dingo!1 So not only do I get the numbers I want, but I also get a calendar view of all the days I took pictures. I’m still far away from the D’Arcy/Alan shot a day stuff but that’s not really my style. I can now look and see that in three months at VCU, I’ve taken more shots than I have in entire years in the past. That doesn’t necessarily mean anything but I’m having fun and I have the mental energy and desire to do things like this in ways I hadn’t previously. Quantity isn’t the goal but lots of practice and lots of reflection ought to create some improvement. 1 It feels right. Surely you aren’t going to argue that bingo really makes better sense somehow?

Like Fish in Water

This Ted Nelson quote seemed like a fun one to try to visualize. I was inspired by this set of minimalist quote posters and found this DS106 assignment that fit the topic pretty well. I used white circles over a blue square to make the waves. Not mind shattering, but a quick easy way to do it that might get some people to think differently. This allows me to adjust them easily after the fact which a number of other ways to do this would not have allowed. I drew the goldfish in Keynote. I really, really need to break myself of that habit but I’ve grown to like the vector drawing in that program despite the many, many shortfalls it has on other levels.

Patents Pending

I saw the reprint/remakes of famous patents for sale on a site a while ago and then today I saw them on My Modern Met which resulted in the example below and a new #ds106 assignment. I remembered that Google lets you browse all kinds of patents and I spent a chunk of time searching for all sorts of patents. It is a fun place. It’s worth keeping in mind that even if there isn’t a thumbnail there are still images. You can also sort by age if you’re looking for older/newer material or look by inventor or company. My first goal was to find something interesting. I look at everything from lightbulbs to submarines but eventually settled on this machine gun. It reminded me of a video game it was so massive looking. That got me the image below. I put it in Photoshop and attempted to improve things using mainly brightness/contrast but wasn’t thrilled with the results. They didn’t look much different that what you see above. So I put it in Illustrator and ran a live trace with the black and white logo as the base setting and touched it up a bit. That improved things some. Not perfect in terms of the lettering but good enough for my purposes here. The next step was to add […]

Walking at Work – Week 17

cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward

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Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

Ruminations from the Test-Prep Industry: How Dare You? Or: Supply, Demand, and Diatribe. “What I think but don’t say is that we “dare” charge what we do because a critical mass of people are willing to pay that much. As someone who thinks capitalism is on the whole pretty icky, it makes a definite amount of sense to me that if what we’re offering is essentially a luxury service, we would charge as much as people are willing to pay. If what we’re offering isn’t food or water or medicine or a foundational education (which, don’t get me started), as long as it’s a sidecar, an add-on, an optional addition to those necessities, why shouldn’t we charge what people will pay, so long as they’re happy with the results? And then I cringe, listening to my own thoughts.” tags: weekly test prep capitalism essential supply demand TCS – Robot Heart: Heart-Shaped Box – Nirvana (covered by Kawehi) – YouTube I don’t know how I feel about the song but the way it all works technically is pretty fascinating. tags: music loops technology weekly youtube video Thomas Christiansen on Learning from 60,000 Observations | Quantified SelfQuantified Self “It’s an iterative process. I’m peeling an onion, and I can continue peeling that onion for the probably the rest of my life. How […]

Walking at Work – Week 16

cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward

Visualizing Jackson Ward: From Start to Finish

TL;DR -First, go check out the Historic/Now Jackson Ward gallery. See the code for a Google SS backend on Github or get the jquery plugin. Read on for an attempt to detail the search and construction process. This is an attempt at ridiculous transparency regarding my search path and building process from start to finish. By the end, I’ll provide a working example of a pre/post slider for historical photographs using a Google Spreadsheet to hold the URLs. This post is overkill and will be painful for anyone not suffering from some condition which should be treated medically. The Search Friday, March 14, 10:30 (ish) PM I read Erin White’s1 THAT Camp proposal about capturing modern images to parallel VCU’s Jackson Ward collection. Eric Johnson’s comment about the Washington Post’s then/now slider got me wondering if I could figure out how that worked and set up something decent prior to Saturday’s sessions. cc licensed ( BY SA ) flickr photo shared by Tom Woodward The search graphic Search #1 – 10:40 PM – javascript slide between photographs I immediately start finding slide show focused pages. So I realize I’m not searching with the right words after about seven sites and around 60 seconds. Search #2 – 10:41 PM – washington post then and now I figure I’ll go see what […]

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Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

Israel’s Orthodox Ravers Are On A Holy Mission To Dance : NPR “Na Nach took off about 30 years ago as a countercultural offshoot of the Breslovers, a Hasidic sect that follows the mystical writings of 19th-century Ukrainian rabbi Nachman of Breslov. Their central belief is that happiness is key to a rich relationship with God, and that it’s their spiritual duty — a mitzvah — to spread that happiness to others.” tags: weekly jewish jew happiness joy mitzvah religion happy A Letter from the Editors—The Appendix “It’s been said that only a tenth of historians’ research makes it into their written work. A tenth of newspapers read, books carried, archives explored, receipts tallied, journals skimmed, letters digested. A tenth of people’s lives sifted to make history manageable and ready for publication. It’s a potent and necessary tenth, but still: a small share of the past, only a fraction of which will ever reach the wider public. Consider The Appendix your new home for the other nine-tenths. It is a quarterly journal of history for the rest of us, a workshop for essays and art about the people and events just outside what gets taught in school. More often than not, The Appendix’s subjects won’t have Wikipedia entries, let alone doorstop-sized biographies of their lives. Instead, The Appendix’s historians, writers […]