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Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

But Is That Ethical? Ask This App. – Wired Campus – Blogs – The Chronicle of Higher Education “The Ethical Decision Making app is an attempt to bring applied ethics into 21st century. It is not so much a Magic 8-Ball as a pocket Socrates,” #thoughtvector technology, ethics, patterns of thought, and a magic 8 ball reference http://t.co/6dUafwnbzJ — Tom Woodward (@twoodwar) May 16, 2014 tags: IFTTT Twitter weekly ethics irony app 8ball thoughtvectors $2 Undecillion Lawsuit “Maybe people just aren’t that valuable. The EPA currently values a human life at $8.7 million, although they go to great lengths to point out that technically this is not actually the value any specific person places on another person’s individual life.[1] In any case, by their measure, the total value we place on all the world’s humans is about $60 trillion—less than the total value we place on all the world’s oil.[2]” Another beautiful What if? by @xkcdComic http://t.co/bx6wrCaJw3 #thoughtvectors — Tom Woodward (@twoodwar) May 16, 2014 tags: IFTTT Twitter weekly money worth humans thoughtvectors xkcd whatif scale Barnstorming – Futility Closet “Perhaps, like a poem, it provides its own reason.” tags: flying rooster weekly plane patent The Latest Hitman Game Was Inspired By The Rich Kids Of Instagram tags: hitman instagram videogame socialmedia weekly Posted from Diigo. The rest of my […]

“Truth” through omission

The mission is “Truth” through omission. Can you get at the underlying truth of a historical document through blackout poetry? Blackout poetry has been fairly popular for a while1 but I haven’t seen any done on historical documents with the intent to get at a deeper, if fairly melodramatic, “truth”. I decided to use The Gulf of Tonkin Resolution. It makes for a pretty interesting way to interact with a dry document and requires a pretty close, and repeated, reading. I like the idea of redaction being a way to expose, rather than hide, things the government would rather not have said. The text from above . . . The United States of America in violation of the principles of the of the Charter of the United Nations and of international law, have deliberately and repeatedly attacked the Communist regime in North Vietnam the United States has territorial, military, political ambitions in that area desires the Congress approves the United States regards the Constitution its obligations reasonable assured except that it may be terminated earlier by concurring resolution of the Congress. 1 It appears Austin Kleon invented the idea in 2010 which seems crazy.

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As We May Think – Annotated

Below is my attempt to use Bush’s essay “As We May Think” as an associative trail. While the hyperlinks are good to go, I don’t think the comments will work all that well in the HTML published format so you can always join in on the actual Google Doc. It’s a mixture of the questions that came to mind as I read, hyperlinks out to additional information, and some other connections that occurred simply because of the way my mind is structured. It made for an interesting experiment and decent preparation for the upcoming #thoughtvectors course. A Google Doc is certainly an easy way to do a version of an associative trail. It allows for hyperlinking and commenting but leaves a bit to be desired in terms of embedding in the blog. I’d like to be able to trigger something like digress.it on the post level in blogs. I’ve tried a number of annotation tools but have yet to find one that really does quite what I want. I certainly use diigo’s highlight/notes function on a regular basis but I worry about the non-html elements on the long term side of things. It also falls short in that I can’t respond or extend note elements in the way I’d like.

10

Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

Make Good Art: Neil Gaiman’s Advice on the Creative Life, Adapted by Design Legend Chip Kidd | Brain Pickings “When things get tough, this is what you should do: Make good art. I’m serious. Husband runs off with a politician — make good art. Leg crushed and then eaten by a mutated boa constrictor — make good art. IRS on your trail — make good art. Cat exploded — make good art. Someone on the Internet thinks what you’re doing is stupid or evil or it’s all been done before — make good art. Probably things will work out somehow, eventually time will take the sting away, and that doesn’t even matter. Do what only you can do best: Make good art. Make it on the bad days, make it on the good days, too. “ tags: weekly art ds106 advice neil Stalin was their drug: Tractor Drivers (1939) | Obskura “Tractor Drivers is a musical film. I simply love the fact that even the musical genre, always defined by escapism it offered to audiences, in the Soviet Union served propaganda purposes. If musical numbers in Hollywood musicals were usually just spectacular disruptions of storyline meant to entertain, in the Soviet musical they were ideological interludes, used to remind the viewer about his duties as a Soviet citizen. This crazy […]

03

Weekly Web Harvest (weekly)

McSweeney’s Internet Tendency: Open Letters: An Open Letter to Your Unreadable Hashtag. ” Of course hashtags existed to convey emotion and tell a story! Once the possibility presented itself, there was no going back. Suddenly, it was literally trending to cram multiple words together behind a pound symbol, and you were born: the unreadable hashtag. Tweets went from 90% update, 10% hashtag to 30% update, 70% hashtag. Some tweets were 100% hashtag, 80% of the time. (Source: Think about everyone you went to college with.) What was once intended to track data is now used ironically as a way to convey un-ironic feelings about mundane topics. We started sacrificing SEO for… I’m not exactly sure what. Popularity? Illegibility? A running inside joke with the Internet?” McSweeny’s on hashtags http://t.co/hpvDhgXo1z #thoughtvectors — Tom Woodward (@twoodwar) May 3, 2014 tags: IFTTT Twitter weekly hashtag data thoughtvectors McSweeney’s Standardized testing and schools as factories: Louis CK versus Common Core – Boing Boing ” The rise of standardized testing, standardized curriculum, and “accountability” are part of the wider phenomenon of framing every question in business terms. In the modern world, the state is a kind of souped up business. That’s why we’re all “taxpayers” instead of “citizens.” “Taxpayer” reframes policy outcomes as a kind of customer-loyalty perk. If your taxes are the locus of […]

Four Leaf Clovers, Question Paths, & Literal Names

Yesterday, I decided I’d look for four leaf clovers getting in and out of my car. Not hanging out searching, just opening my eyes and paying a bit more attention. Wikipedia tells me there’s one four leaf clover per 10,000 three leaf clovers. What surprises me is despite their relative rarity just how many four leaf clovers seem to be out there. It’s like interesting things. If you just start looking around, you end up amazed at how many interesting things surround you daily that you never noticed. One interesting thing leads to another. It gets to be harder to pay attention to more mundane things like crossing the road because there are so many interesting things to see and think about. Generating Questions I tried to take pictures representing each question I had walking to work the other day. I only decided to do it about halfway in but it was interesting to see it snowball because I made it intentional. The results are embedded below as a set. Additional questions are sometimes in the descriptions and won’t be visible in the embedded view. Created with Admarket’s flickrSLiDR. Literally Literal Dodge Caravan takes on a very odd feel if you read it literally. I decided to start capturing all the car/bike names I came across that were also actual […]