More Mixed Media

Lessons Learned the Hard Way – this could be a lot of fun with literary and historical figures. Real Life Fodder for Copyright Conversations “But honestly Monica, the Web is considered ‘public domain’ and you should be happy we just didn’t ‘lift’ your whole article and put someone else’s name on it!… If you took offence and are unhappy, I am sorry, but you as a professional should know that the article we used written by you was in very bad need of editing, and is much better now than [it] was originally…. For that reason, I have a bit of a difficult time with your requests for monetary gain, albeit for such a fine (and very wealthy!) institution. We put some time into rewrites, you should compensate me! I never charge young writers for advice or rewriting poorly written pieces, and have many who write for me… ALWAYS for free!”[14][15] Participate in primary source research in real life. Geography, history, science. Old Weather Help scientists recover worldwide weather observations made by Royal Navy ships around the time of World War I. These transcriptions will contribute to climate model projections and improve a database of weather extremes. Historians will use your work to track past ship movements and the stories of the people on board.

Bestiary Images & Copyright

I’m going to be doing a presentation before too long where I look at blogging and web 2.0 through the lens of a Medieval bestiary. I thought this was a solid concept in part because I figured none of the images would be under copyright since they’d have long since passed into public domain. What I found on a number of different sites did not reflect that. Many of the .edu sites that had quality bestiary images also had pretty restrictive copyright claims as well. This didn’t make sense to me and so I started digging around and found a number of well referenced claims that said, essentially, that scans of public domain works are not derivatives and so are not under separate copyright. The case repeatedly cited was Bridgeman v. Corel. I’m not a lawyer and am not giving you legal advice but you can read one lawyer’s take on all this at the Library Law Blog (Mary Minow, J.D., A.M.L.S.). She’s got a lot more nuance in her post so if you’re nervous I’d read it and make your own decision but I feel good about what I’m doing. I’m cleaning up the images and posting them to Flickr if you think they’d be of use to you. The majority are pngs with transparent backgrounds (some of which […]

Education and Copyright

The educational copyright site I’ve been working on with some of our media resource teachers is now pretty much done. I’m fairly satisfied with it. It addresses a lot of information pretty succinctly and no one is called a thief or a criminal. I’m proud of that. I’ve also got a powerpoint presentation that is pretty slick looking (if I do say so myself). There’s not much for text on the slides but the notes are pretty packed with information. Both the website and the presentation stick to the “what can you do?” vibe as much as possible and stress the options you have with Creative Commons and public domain works. It’ll be interesting to see if it makes any real difference. I did try to keep things humorous and all photos are Flickr based under a CC license.

A Little Trick for Mac Folk (now PC as well!)

THE PROBLEM I download a lot of Flick CC photos* for various presentations. I’m doing a decent job citing them but I usually do that on the spot so unless I want to re-find the picture or dig out the old presentation and find the citation there I can’t easily re-use them. *go to advanced search for CC licensed photos THE SOLUTION Now when I download the picture from Flickr I select the photo and hit Apple+i (some people say command-i) and then put the flickr URL in the spotlight comments box. So now if I need to use the photo again, I just hit Apple-i and I’ve got the citation right there. It’s also not a bad place to throw in a few tags. And while this is simple and I’m sure lots of people already do this it’s helped me out already. PC UPDATE A wise man (my dad who is a serious PC guy) writes in to tell me- There is a PC counterpart. Right click on the file, Left click on “Properties,” Left click on “Summary” tab. Quick video below, if you’re a visual person. I used keycastr to add the keystrokes I used like Jim suggested in an earlier post. In case the Teachertube embed doesn’t work click here.

Copyright

I have some how found myself on our district’s copyright committee and we’re redesigning our whole course for teachers. It’s been pretty interesting and I only occasionally want to kill myself. Luckily, I’m with a bunch of ninja librarian copyright experts who are handling all the heavy lifting while I make jokes. The site is up here (but not finished) if you’re interested. There are some odd comic style scenarios I’m making as well. They are at least marginally funny although I realize I have a Comic Life addiction but I’m seeking help. Click to enlarge