Social Work Digital Portfolio – Google Docs Style

Image from page 589 of “Modern magic. : A practical treatise on the art of conjuring.” (1885) flickr photo by Internet Archive Book Images shared with no copyright restriction (Flickr Commons) Our Social Work program has traditionally done large paper-based student portfolios. They wanted to move to something digital. That led to some conversations about Google Docs and our options there. They needed the ability to- provision a set of folders and documents to individual students allow the students to edit/add to the folders stop editing rights at a certain date make the student folder anonymous for faculty reviewers The solution I ended up coming up with uses a Google Spreadsheet with some custom Google Script. It’s based on a spreadsheet with column A being the student email and column B being the anonymous number or name. You make a parent folder (Social Work 2017) and put the spreadsheet and the folder (student portfolio) you want to copy in the folder. You add the student emails and secret IDs to the spreadsheet. The script is activated via custom-menu element imaginatively entitled ‘Share Files’ and it copies the student portfolio for each student email listed, names it with the addition of the secret ID, and gives the student editor rights to their particular folder and its contents. It also writes the […]

Portfolio Work – Interweaving the Personal API

I know. The title is pure click-bait. That’s part of why this blog is so wildly popular.1 I’ve been building a new portfolio site2 and I think some of this is kind of interesting even if it sounds boring. There are a few different goals in play. One challenge is to create a site that stays up to date with minimal work on my end. It’s a parallel of the small-pieces-loosely-joined mentality. I want tiny-actions-over-time (from the aforementioned small pieces) rather than widely-spaced-herculean efforts. I’m also trying to make sure that it fits in well with my current workflow and that I’m capturing the work I do elsewhere in ways that make sense. Another focus is to keep any work highly portable. I’ve had to re-enter data a number of times as I’ve migrated and I don’t want to do that any more. That’s going to be made possible mainly through some new API options and by working on my API/JSON, JavaScript skills. I’ll probably have to do chunks of it over anyway but I like to pretend I wont. I’ve got a ways to go but I’ve made some decent progress. The basic template/visuals are handled by Bootstrap. I’ve also got some simple Angular views, Timeline JS, JSON from Google sheets, WordPress WP Rest API v2, and Pinboard’s API. […]

The Tao of Posts

I’ve been having quite a few conversations around student portfolios eportfolios online representations of their learning over time. These conversations have mostly centered on using WordPress and, almost inevitably, the first instinct is to create a series of pages that are aligned to either courses or assignments. Those pages usually contain a number of different pieces of content. That structure makes the most sense to people who are used to building websites in the Dreamweaver/static paradigm. I don’t think this is the right path in most cases. It’s easy in the short term but starts to limit you (absent lots of work) in the long run. Strange that I don't really know what a web page is anymore. Individual tweet? Blog post? Flickr image? #vcuols — Tom Woodward (@twoodwar) May 14, 2014 At the heart of this is the issue that “page” is hard to define. In the broadest sense anything I can address with a URL is a webpage. That’s a big bucket. WordPress makes things more complex by including a way to create pieces of content called “pages.” Pages are usually contrasted to posts. I usually described1 the page/post difference was that posts were pieces of content that flowed with the timeline (more ephemeral but archived) and pages were pieces of content you wanted to be more permanent/static. […]