HTTPS Insecure Content Fixer Plugin

If you’ve got a site running on HTTPS and you try to throw in some HTTP content, the browser gets nervous. If you’ve recently made a shift to HTTPS you might notice content that was successfully embedded disappearing. If you look in the browser (right click>inspect element in Chrome), you’ll see an error like the one above. What you want in this scenario is protocol relative URLS . . . essentially a URL without the leading http/https. That lets the page load via the one protocol that matches (assuming it exists- some sites won’t supply HTTPS options).1 I ran into this problem with files we uploaded via Gravity Forms prior to the switch to HTTPS. There are a number of ways to deal with this (including search/replace at the database level) but we’re under a very heavy load at the moment and I just needed a quick fix. This solution will also allow people to do whatever they want on an ongoing basis better than a database response. This tiny little filter plugin is the result. All it does is use PHP’s preg_replace (regex) function to find any instances of HTTP or HTTPS (capital or lowercase) and remove them. I’m still amazed by regex but always end up having to spend a bit of time reminding myself of how it […]

WordPress Reflection Plugin – Step 1 – Counting Links

The idea that technology ought to help students reflect on their use of technology seems to make sense. As we have more and more students engaging in online writing little things come to light. Take the humble/magical hyperlink for example. We often look at the use of hyperlinks as a marker for progress in digital fluency. Are students using the thing that makes the web so webby? Can we help make that a point of reflection for them?1 I had a conversation with Laura a while back about pulling out URLs and looking at the their use over time by students.2 Clearly, these aren’t pure quantitative things. You’ll never say “Six links? Failure!” or even “Seventy four links? That’s an A+.” Not that I would ever think that about you but this is on the Internet and I don’t want anyone tying hyperlink numbers to Bloom’s levels and then linking to me. But it would be interesting to look back over your writing and see when you use lots of links and when you don’t. So, at the moment, that’s what this plugin does. It’ll do some more tricks in the future but these are early days. The plugin as it sits now (below) will do three things. It’ll run a regex on the post and store all the URLs […]

findURL – Custom Google Function Fun

via the magical XKCD Fun being a fairly relative term . . . but I’m amused. The Meat You can write custom functions in Google Spreadsheets and then use them like other built in functions. I didn’t realize that. The script below1 grabs all the URLs from a chunk of text. You could add it to your spreadsheet in Google by going to Tools>Script Editor and opening a blank project. Replace all of the content with this and then save it. You can now use it like other functions by putting =findULR(A1) (assuming A1 is the text chunk you want). It spits out a single cell with the URLs in it on individual lines and with a count of the URLs found at the top of that cell. I’ve commented up the script below in case you want to understand/change it to better suit your needs. Next Steps The regex works well about 90-95% of the time. So it sure beats doing it by hand but it could be improved. You can try your own stuff here. The post I’m using there is pretty messy so it’s a good thing to check against. It’s hard to guess what odd things people will do with URLs. I’ve already seen people doing stuff like “”http://blah.com””. No idea why they did double quotes. […]

Google Sheets Love – REGEXEXTRACT & IMPORTFEED

flickr photo shared by CraigMoulding under a Creative Commons ( BY-SA ) license Just two little functions in Google Sheets that came up as we tried to quickly pull comments from a blog for some other work. It was an odd scenario but the techniques should have other useful applications. IMPORTFEED The function below pulls my 10 most recent comments into a spreadsheet. You can set it to pull more but will also need to change the number of items in your RSS feed. You can find that setting under Settings>Reading. It’ll work on any RSS feed and there are a variety of other IMPORT functions that are worth checking out. This could be a useful option if you wanted to analyze the comments in one place or if you wanted to look a bit more deeply at comments on sites you don’t control. 1 1 I had to switch this to code because copy/paste led to issues with quotes messing up the formula.

Scraping Instagram

flickr photo shared by ajmexico under a Creative Commons ( BY ) license I’m trying to step up my programming game a bit.1 APIs are also getting more and more accessible to jokers like myself.2 (In this case I also use php, cron, and some regex.) All of this should make Alan very proud. But I’m relatively terrible at doing things without a purpose. Luckily one wandered in on Tuesday. A faculty member who I’ve worked with a few times before came in and asked if there was any way to grab Instagram data for a project on social media and health that focused on vaping and ecigs. I’m not one to look a gift project in the mouth so I said I’d take a stab at it. Step one was to check out Instagram’s API3– in particular I wanted to see the tag endpoints. Those are URLs that give you access to JSON data. To get at these you need to register as an Instagram developer and register a client. This is a pretty straightforward process. After that I browsed around GitHub to see what might already exist. This got me to the Instagram PHP API. I always start by wandering GitHub much like I start my WordPress work by looking at plugins first. It took me a long […]