Will Wonka asking you to tell him again what WordPress can't do.

Tweaking the WP Base JSON Data

We had a list of rampages sites in a Google Spreadsheet and wanted to know when they were created. I started to look that up but only managed to do it twice before I gave up and went in search of another way. In this case it took two little bits of code. This first piece is active on our generic site-wide plugin. It adds the blog’s creation date, last updated, and post count to the base JSON data. That’ll be handy in the future if we want to checkup on sites with only one query rather than multiple queries. This second piece is a Google Script that makes a function that I can call in the sheet by typing =getCreationDate(“http://someurl.com/”) The two together answer my immediate problem but the JSON modifications have some long-term value for us and might be useful to someone else.

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Add Custom Field to WordPress API & Filter

I found myself in a strange situation where I needed to know if a page had a child. Natively the WP API lets you know if a page has a parent but not the reverse. First I had to write a function that writes some data to a custom field if a page has a child. Then I started writing this post and realized I needed to do the reverse and now I’ve written a function that writes data to a parent when the child is created. Now that I had the data being written to the custom field, I needed to make that data visible in the WP REST API. Luckily, Jeff put up a snippet for that not too long ago. Now I also wanted to be able to return data based on the contents of the has_children field. This filter1 does that. Now a URL like the one below will give me pages with children but without parents. /wp-json/wp/v2/pages?_embed&per_page=30&has_children=1&parent=0 This will help me make a fairly large menu structure more manageable and I figured having something like this all in one place might help someone else. 1 I usually call things ‘chunks’ of code but I’m trying to improve my vocab.

A drawing of a small terrier dog jumping through a hoop held by a monkey.

WP API Feed Reader POC

Image from page 96 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873) flickr photo by Internet Archive Book Images shared with no copyright restriction (Flickr Commons) I’ve talked to a number of people a number of times about seeing faculty using Feed WordPress to syndicate content to a motherblog when they’d really be better served by using a feed reader like Feedly.1 Feed WordPress is great and very useful but if you don’t want to archive the content or take advantage of some of the more advanced options (auto-categorizing, auto-tagging, doing stuff with author pages etc.) then it usually is a bit more hassle than it’s worth. I thought it’d be pretty easy to build a little custom page to display a series feeds from sites in one place. It took me a bit to get it straight but it wasn’t too bad. This example loads 10 sites fairly quickly. I’m currently just showing the source site’s URL and the 5 most recent posts with titles and dates. It’d be easy enough to add other stuff – excerpt, full post content, featured image etc. It’d also be pretty easy to pass the URLs to the page from a Google Spreadsheet which I’ll probably do in the near future. See the Pen wp json api multi fetch by Tom (@twwoodward) on CodePen. 1 Obligatory […]

timeline of last 50 posts

WP JSON to Timeline JS

As part of some thoughts on building out a series of reflective views for student portfolio blogs, I thought seeing your WordPress posts in the TimelineJS view might be a useful way to look back over your progress. I intend to wrap this into a custom spreadsheet template and/or a plugin1 but figured I’d sketch out how it works so far in case anyone was interested. The WP Rest API makes it pretty easy to write the data via Google Script. I just want to cut out chunks of the data and put it in the right fields. The following script does that and writes it to a page named “wp.” 1 Or maybe just a page where you throw in a blog URL and get a bunch of alternate view/data options.