I’m not dead yet . . . Google Scripts to Check on a Bunch of WP Sites

John Stewart is going to write up something more systematic and structured as he’s taken these rough ideas up a notch but I figured I’d throw this functional Google Script code in here before I lost it. I believe I got up to five positive statements on blogging more in-process stuff so I’m taking that as an overwhelming mandate. These Google Script functions are meant to loop through a set of URLs in a Google Sheet pulled as an array to see if the site’s still in use. The first two take a look at the WP REST API endpoints for posts and pages. That way if the person only writes pages you won’t be tricked. I’d probably write them all to the sheet because I’m paranoid. The third (aka the hassle as I hadn’t ever messed with XML using javascript) looks at the RSS/XML feed in case the site is not updated enough to have a functional API endpoint or if it’s broken for some reason. This won’t help you out if they’re just writing pages but there’s only so much a person can do. John made a more robust structure with error checking, the piece where it writes to the spreadsheet etc. and I’ll loop in his post once it’s up.

WordPress – Comments to Spreadsheet

Image from page 981 of “A system of instruction in X-ray methods and medical uses of light, hot-air, vibration and high-frequency currents : a pictorial system of teaching by clinical instruction plates with explanatory text : a series of photographic cli flickr photo by Internet Archive Book Images shared with no copyright restriction (Flickr Commons) This is a bit odd but if you work in education it’s quite possible it’ll come up . . . Sometimes people just want the blog comments in a nice friendly CSV file. That might be for grading, it might be for further analysis in Voyant or something like that. What I need to do is write a little plugin for the export like Alan did for posts but until I get around to that I took advantage of another plugin Alan wrote to expand comments to the 100 most recent comments. So since I have lots of comments available in the feed, I can just use the =IMPORTXML function to port right into Google Sheets. There’s probably a smart way to parse out multiple XML fields at a time but this seems to work ok. All the functions I used are broken down in the sheet embedded below. Most are simply some version of IMPORTXML(b1,”//title”). B1 is the URL for the feed and the […]

Import Blackboard Common Cartridge into WordPress

flickr photo shared by Internet Archive Book Images with no copyright restriction (Flickr Commons) It’s far from pretty and I don’t know how well it’ll play with other courses but . . . here’s the plugin I used to import a few Blackboard course exports into WordPress. It’s nothing magical but I think it should get you most of the WordPress kind of content on courses sort of like these. It won’t pull in quizzes or anything like that and I make no attempt to map user/user roles. I just want the page content, discussion prompts, that sort of stuff. I opted to pull this content in as posts and tag them (as opposed to the Moodle import where I used Pages and parent/child relationships). It just seemed like the right path based on the content. In any case, here’s the code. It’s super ugly as I adapted some stuff I was playing around with during my Moodle attempts. It loads the xml file twice and probably does other things that will make programmers sad but honestly I was bored with it and didn’t feel it was worth re-writing. I just wanted it to work. It may also be a terrible example to set as I’m not sure I want people importing their Blackboard courses into WordPress. I do know […]

Importing Moodle into WordPress

flickr photo shared by Internet Archive Book Images with no copyright restriction (Flickr Commons) A week or two ago some faculty members asked me about getting the Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental Disabilities (LEND) content out of the Moodle hosted at Vanderbilt and into WordPress. I figured I could do this. Someone might even have done it already. If not, I figured the export options would have to put out something fairly straightforward that could be parsed. In any case, the majority of my learning comes from committing to things I don’t quite know how to do. Turns out I couldn’t find anyone who’d done this before. I went a variety of different routes as I attempted not to do the work myself. First, I exported the course in the two different flavors that were available (SCORM1/Course Cartridge and Moodle backup). Just for fun I tried a few different flavors of import plugins . . . Edwiser Bridge might have worked but required a higher level of connection to Moodle than I felt like dealing with and seemed more focused on integration rather than migration, Simple CSV Importer and WP All Import both failed to do what I needed despite pushing XML around a bit to try to make it work. So with all the ready-made solutions exhausted2 I turned to […]

Private Comments via XMLIMPORT

Making shareable (Sharing with a single person or specific group but not with the world.) comments on public writing is a fairly awkward spaaaaaace right now. There are things like AnnotateIt and Awesome Screenshot and the annotations in Diigo. So I’m looking around for other free options and brain storming odd ideas and not find a whole lot and I came up with the following . . . Note: I’m not saying this is a good idea, it may even be a bad idea but it might inspire someone to do something more interesting down the line.1 I at least found it mildly amusing. Here’s how you might pull an author feed from WordPress into Google Spreadsheets with separate cells each paragraph (for paragraph level commenting). The idea being that you can share the Google document with just that student and do the commenting via the GSS commenting feature. Google spreadsheets will import lots of things (xml, atom, rss). WordPress provides lots of specific feeds (author, tag, categories, combinations thereof). So step one is to get the author feed – for example http://rampages.us/fren330/author/sheehantm/feed/. You can then use the IMPORTXML formula in GSS to import that XML and do some XPATH parsing of the pieces. In this case I used =IMPORTXML(“http://rampages.us/fren330/author/sheehantm/”,”//p”) to pull out the paragraphs. I can then share the […]