• Sent From My iPhone: how a humblebrag became a key piece of net etiquette | Technology | The Guardian

    And it works. The researchers Caleb T Carr and Chad Stefaniak found in their paper Sent From My iPhone: The Medium and Message as Cues of Sender Professionalism in Mobile Telephony that those receiving a message containing spelling and grammatical errors forgiving of the mistakes when sent from a phone. What’s more,it boosted credibility over and above a perfectly worded message without the caveat. They also found for a poorly worded and incorrectly spelled message from a desktop or laptop, credibility dropped. Users forgave errors attributed to the constraints of writing on a tiny touch screen, but not mistakes made on a computer.

  • Comprehensive list of Twitter accounts for Auburn players, coaches | Columbus Ledger-Enquirer

    Seventy-five percent of Auburn’s roster (100 players) have an active Twitter account going into the 2016 season.

  • Meet the man siphoning money from Donald Trump – POLITICO

    an Hawes, a 25-year-old Maryland man who has no affiliation with Trump or his campaign and who has preyed on more than 20,000 unsuspecting donors, collecting more than $1 million in the process.

    In just its first three weeks of operation, Hawes’ PAC spent more than $108,000 on Facebook ads, offering an opportunity to win “Dinner with Donald Trump” — and netted itself nearly $350,000 in donations, according to federal records.

    The biggest chunk of the money raised — $133,000 — went to a company that Hawes founded and owns, CartSoft LLC. The purpose of the payments is described on federal records as “media” and “media purchasing,” though CartSoft’s website describes itself as an online payment-processing platform.

    Since its launch, the PAC has collected more than $1 million, Hawes told POLITICO. It has reportedly spent $0 on behalf of Trump.

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