Weekly Web Harvest for 2018-10-07

  • An Airbnb guesthouse of horrors – The Boston Globe
    “Sorry about the confusion. Life’s too short for me to give you an explanation. Have a nice time in LA.”
  • “I just know” replaces systematic reviews at top of evidence pyramid
    “After much research and deliberation, we feel we cannot ignore what a parent or conspiracy theorist feels “in their gut”. There are just too many anecdotes and too many people buying untested alternative health products to ignore this any longer,” explained SHEA spokesman Dr. Harold Rami.
  • New U.S. Weapons Systems Are a Hackers’ Bonanza, Investigators Find – The New York Times
    Sometimes the testing teams toyed with their Pentagon targets. One team “reported that they caused a pop-up message to appear on users’ terminals instructing them to insert two quarters to continue operating.”
  • Enigma Public
    We’ve curated the world’s broadest collection of public data into a single searchable, explorable web portal and API.
  • awesomedata/awesome-public-datasets: A topic-centric list of high-quality open datasets in public domains. New PR ???
    This list of a topic-centric public data sources in high quality. They are collected and tidied from blogs, answers, and user responses. Most of the data sets listed below are free, however, some are not. Other amazingly awesome lists can be found in sindresorhus’s awesome list.
  • A philosopher explains how our addiction to stories keeps us from understanding history – The Verge
    The problem is, these historical narratives seduce you into thinking you really understand what’s going on and why things happened, but most of it is guessing people’s motives and their inner thoughts. It allays your curiosity, and you’re satisfied psychologically by the narrative, and it connects the dots so you feel you’re in the shoes of the person whose narrative is being recorded. It has seduced you into a false account, and now you think you understand.

    The second part is that it effectively prevents you from going on to try to find the right theory and correct account of events. And the third problem, which is the gravest, is that people use narratives because of their tremendous emotional impact to drive human actions, movements, political parties, religions, ideologies. And many movements, like nationalism and intolerant religions, are driven by narrative and are harmful and dangerous for humanity.

  • “Telling the Bees” | JSTOR Daily
    This practice of “telling the bees” may have its origins in Celtic mythology where the presence of a bee after a death signified the soul leaving the body, but the tradition appears to have been most prominent in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in the U.S. and Western Europe. The ritual involves notifying honey bees of major events in the beekeeper’s life, such as a death or marriage.

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