Weekly Web Harvest for 2018-12-30

  • What’s Next for Hack Education
    I am hoping that the shift away from compiling all the goings-on for that weekly news round-up will give me more time to think deeply and critically about education and technology, instead of perpetually being enraged by how many terrible and silly things are marketed as “solutions” by folks who just want to sell a product or service – some aware, some unaware that their very well-funded load of futurist bullshit is pretty damn dystopian.

    —best wishes to Audrey as I couldn’t do more than skim those weekly round-ups because I found them so deeply depressing

  • The Chaos – Gerard Nolst Trenité
    classic English poem containing about 800 of the worst irregularities in English spelling and pronunciation.
  • Why Data Is Never Raw – The New Atlantis
    “Raw data is both an oxymoron and a bad idea; to the contrary, data should be cooked with care.” “Raw” carries a sense of natural or untouched, while “cooked” suggests the result of cognitive processes. But data is always the product of cognitive, cultural, and institutional processes that determine what to collect and how to collect it. In this sense, “raw data” is indeed a contradiction in terms. In the ordinary use of the term “raw data,” “raw” signifies that no processing was performed following data collection, but the term obscures the various forms of processing that necessarily occur before data collection.
  • Microsoft/jericho: A learning environment for Interactive Fiction games.
    Jericho is an environment that connects learning agents with interactive fiction games. Jericho uses Frotz and Ztools to provide a fast, python-based interface to Z-machine games.
  • Wielding Rocks and Knives, Arizonans Attack Self-Driving Cars – The New York Times
    “They didn’t ask us if we wanted to be part of their beta test,”

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  1. Scratch pad thoughts – Jeremy Felt said on January 12, 2019 at 5:21 pm

    […] pad thoughts for {date}”. I’ll note this is inspired by Tom Woodward’s “Weekly Web Harvest” posts and the “Four short links” format used by Nat Torkington at O’Reilly […]