• “I don’t see myself as a real game developer. I make games because it’s fun, and because I love games and I love to program, but I don’t make games with the intention of them becoming huge hits, and I don’t try to change the world. Minecraft certainly became a huge hit, and people are telling me it’s changed games. I never meant for it to do either. It’s certainly flattering, and to gradually get thrust into some kind of public spotlight is interesting.

    tags: weekly minecraft game leaving

  • “As Samuel Johnson once wrote: “Some are always in a state of preparation, occupied in previous measures, forming plans, accumulating materials and providing for the main affair. These are certainly under the secret power of idleness. Nothing is to be expected from the workman whose tools are for ever to be sought.””

    tags: productivity weekly work do make

  • Should probably give us pause about a number of things.

    tags: stanford research community reinforcement socialmedia grading weekly

    • Not only do authors of negatively-evaluated con-tent contribute more, but also their future posts are oflower quality, and are perceived by the community assuch. Moreover, these authors are more likely to sub-sequently evaluate their fellow users negatively, perco-lating these effects through the community. In contrast,positive feedback does not carry similar effects, and nei-ther encourages rewarded authors to write more, nor im-proves the quality of their posts. Interestingly, the au-thors that receive no feedback are most likely to leavea community.
  • “”[A] kimono is made from exactly one bolt of fabric. The way the pattern of a kimono is constructed, not one scrap of fabric remains after the garment is completed. Once the kimono showed signs of wear, it began a long line of transformations – from Sunday best to an everyday item of clothing. When it was further worn, the kimono would be used as a sleeping gown or shortened to make an outdoor jacket. When further worn, the jacket would be turned into a bag or an apron. Finally, layers of scraps were sashiko quilted together into dust cloths. But sashiko was also used to strengthen fabric and in the north, it was used to secure layers of fabric together for protection against the elements. What began as utilitarian stitching began to be used as a decorative element as well and patterns evolved from the daily lives of the quilters.”

    — Sashiko by Cortney Heimerl (via lizettegreco)”
    “”[A] kimono is made from exactly one bolt of fabric. The way the pattern of a kimono is constructed, not one scrap of fabric remains after the garment is completed. Once the kimono showed signs of wear, it began a long line of transformations – f…

    tags: IFTTT Delicious Diigo kimono weekly

  • Your grandmother’s secret identity.

    tags: IFTTT Delicious Diigo tagging facebook weird tweet weekly grandma grandmasterflash socialmedia

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