Weekly Web Harvest for 2017-07-23

  • MS Paint has had a bit of an upgrade • Eurogamer.net

    “Your elevators are very confusing,” I suggested when I finally got to Microsoft. But it turns out that the man I was meeting did not agree. They’re amazing, he explained. You get used to them and then all other elevators are rubbish. I am paraphrasing, because this article is not really about elevators, but he laid out a glorious scenario where you check in at the front desk in the lobby and by the time you get to the elevator bay, your private elevator is already waiting for you. Valet service! This was the world this man from Microsoft already lived in. This was the sparkling water he drank every day.

  • Make Concrete Roman Again!

    But he reminded Titus of his basic challenge—that it was, “indeed, no easy task to give novelty to what is old, and authority to what is new.” 

  • Steve Schoger

    some nice simple web typography tips

  • The Evolution of Trust
  • Ze Frank – Wikipedia

    Discussing his work in the digital medium, and the potential of new platforms like Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, Frank said, “For me, experimentation is not about the technology. In an ever-changing technological landscape, where today’s platforms are not tomorrow’s platforms, the key seems to be that any one of these spaces can use a dose of humanity and art and culture.”[10]

  • On this day: Australia’s Emu Wars begin – Australian Geographic

    Within a week of first contact the troops were recalled. Roughly 2500 rounds had been fired and killed somewhere between 50 and 200 emus. Meredith did note that his men had suffered no casualties. When the question was raised if a medal would be struck for the conflict, federal labor parliamentarian A.E. Green replied that any medals should go to the emus who had ‘won every round so far’. For his involvement in the deployment, Defence Minister George Pearce earned the unofficial title ‘Minister for the Emu War’.

  • Blog | Library Innovation Lab

    Still, the canvas remains a largely intact record of the aesthetics and commercialization patterns of the internet circa 2005. It is populated by pixelated representations of clunky fonts, advertisements for sketchy looking internet gambling sites, and promises of risqué images. Many of the pixel blocks bear a familial resemblance to today’s clickbait banner ads, with scantily clothed models and promises of free goods and content. Of course, this eye-catching pixel art serves a specific purpose: to get the user to click, redirecting to a site of the buyer’s choosing. What happens when we do?

  • Celebrating 30 years in VR: Professor Robert J. Stone on Human Factors and the Future of VR and AR

    In healthcare generally, we have, in the past, developed VR and AR for surgical training and education; today, we’re investigating the delivery of virtual scenes of nature into hospital intensive care wards to help improve patient sleep quality and post-operative rehabilitation.

  • share-this: Medium-like text sharing

    Medium style tool tip sharing

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