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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-09-11

Teen Sues Parents for Posting Childhood Photos on Facebook | Mental Floss But it led to legal trouble for one Austrian couple when their 18-year-old daughter slapped them with a lawsuit for refusing to remove hundreds of embarrassing baby photos, The Local reports. The teen, whose name has not been released to the public, claims the over 500 childhood pictures posted to the social networking site without her consent violate her privacy. “They knew no shame and no limit—and didn’t care whether it was a picture of me sitting on the toilet or lying naked in my cot—every stage was photographed and then made public” she told The Local. “I’m tired of not being taken seriously by my parents.” dy/dan » Blog Archive » The Desmos Guide to Building Great (Digital) Math Activities Create an intellectual need for new mathematical skills. Ask yourself, “Why did a mathematician invent the skill I’m trying to help students learn? What problem were they trying to solve? How did this skill make their intellectual life easier?” Then ask yourself, “How can I help students experience that need?” We calculate because calculations offer more certainty than estimations. We use variables so we don’t have to run the same calculation over and over again. We prove because we want to settle some doubt. Before we offer […]

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-09-04

The Myth of the Millennial as Cultural Rebel | New Republic Fusion’s Patrick Hogan counted 47 institutions and industries that millennials have been accused of destroying so far, including credit, car culture, the American Dream, relationships, and golf. Of course, in each of these cases, there is a real story to be told: Yes, young people are buying less on credit; yes, car sales are down; and, not surprisingly, 48 percent of economically squeezed under-30s don’t buy into the uplift of the American Dream, according to one poll. Benefits | NASA GRC WordPress The following are the main benefits we’ve found in using our implementation of WordPress as a content management system for the NASA Glenn Research Center web sites we maintain. THIEF! | People’s History Archive “The Worst Thief Is He Who Steals The Playtime of Children” — W.D. Haywood — Join The I.W.W. And Help Put The Thieves To Work. What If Medicine’s First Principle Were Also Education’s? | Psychology Today • In a study in which 150 college students were asked to described the two most negative experiences in their lives—experiences that negatively affected their development—by far the most common reports (28% of the total) were of traumatic interactions with school teachers.[5]  In a study in which adults were interviewed to find out about positive, peak learning […]

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-08-28

Sent From My iPhone: how a humblebrag became a key piece of net etiquette | Technology | The Guardian And it works. The researchers Caleb T Carr and Chad Stefaniak found in their paper Sent From My iPhone: The Medium and Message as Cues of Sender Professionalism in Mobile Telephony that those receiving a message containing spelling and grammatical errors forgiving of the mistakes when sent from a phone. What’s more,it boosted credibility over and above a perfectly worded message without the caveat. They also found for a poorly worded and incorrectly spelled message from a desktop or laptop, credibility dropped. Users forgave errors attributed to the constraints of writing on a tiny touch screen, but not mistakes made on a computer. Comprehensive list of Twitter accounts for Auburn players, coaches | Columbus Ledger-Enquirer Seventy-five percent of Auburn’s roster (100 players) have an active Twitter account going into the 2016 season. Meet the man siphoning money from Donald Trump – POLITICO an Hawes, a 25-year-old Maryland man who has no affiliation with Trump or his campaign and who has preyed on more than 20,000 unsuspecting donors, collecting more than $1 million in the process. In just its first three weeks of operation, Hawes’ PAC spent more than $108,000 on Facebook ads, offering an opportunity to win “Dinner with Donald Trump” […]

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-08-21

Your drain on drugs: Meth seeps into Baltimore’s streams – CNN.com Here’s why: These plants and bugs are the base of the aquatic food web. Birds eat the bugs, as do frogs and fish. As emergent contaminants such as pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors become more common in ground and drinking water, they could affect humans. Scientists say the direct health effects are pretty much unknown, and more research will need to be done. h/t Jon Becker Handwriting Just Doesn’t Matter – The New York Times A month later, Alabama required the teaching of cursive in public schools by the end of third grade by way of “Lexi’s Law,” named for the granddaughter of the state representative Dickie Drake; Mr. Drake believes “cursive writing identifies you as much as your physical features do.” In other words, our script reveals something unique and ineluctable about our inner being. For most of American history, cursive was supposed to do the opposite. Mastering it was dull, repetitive work, intended to make every student’s handwriting match a standardized model. In the mid-19th century, that model was Spencerian script. It was replaced by the Palmer Method, which was seen as a more muscular and masculine hand suitable for the industrial age — a “plain and rapid style,” as Austin Palmer described it, to replace the more […]

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-08-14

Walmart’s Out-of-Control Crime Problem Is Driving Police Crazy To cut down on calls to police, Walmart has been rolling out a program where first-time offenders caught stealing merchandise below a certain value can avoid arrest if they agree to go through a theft-prevention program. At some higher-crime stores, the company is also hiring off-duty police and private security officers. According to Walmart Stores executives, it’s all starting to work. Police chiefs and their officers on the ground say that’s just not so. Ross likes to joke that the concentration of crime at Walmart makes his job easier. “I’ve got all my bad guys in one place,” he says, flashing a bright smile. His squad’s sergeant, Robert Rohloff, a 34-year police veteran who has to worry about staffing, budgets, and patrolling the busiest commercial district in Tulsa, says there’s nothing funny about Walmart’s impact on public safety. He can’t believe, he says, that a multibillion-dollar corporation isn’t doing more to stop crime. Instead, he says, it offloads the job to the police at taxpayers’ expense. “It’s ridiculous—we are talking about the biggest retailer in the world,” says Rohloff. “I may have half my squad there for hours.”

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-08-07

Amazon’s Interesting Finds/Prehistoric Invertebrates/Fraudster Calls / Boing Boing TIP: Any bones or skulls you collect can be whitened up without using chlorine bleach, which can weaken the bone. Use concentration hydrogen peroxide, which will fizz and brighten bone to a brilliant white very quickly. You need stronger stuff than the dilute peroxide found in drug stores. Head to the hair care aisle or hair product stores, and look for bottles of concentrated H2O2 in bottles labeled as Clairoxide or the like. — KK

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-07-31

Ten Theses In Support of Teaching and Against Learning Outcomes | Jeff Noonan: Interventions and Evocations Lots of good stuff in here. “awakening in students a desire to think by revealing to them the questionability of things” h/t Amy Collier On extraordinariness — Code for America Blog — Medium I’m not a fan of the way this glorifies things but . . . “Admiration and gratitude for a public servant who has achieved the impossible. Made things work in spite of the rules, not because of them. Broken dozens of protocols, risked his job. “He made it work. He’s the only guy who can run it. He knows it wouldn’t work without him so he’s deferred his retirement. I mean…he’s extraordinary.” Meet Moxie Marlinspike, the Anarchist Bringing Encryption to All of Us | WIRED that yes, people will use encryption to do illegal things. And that may just be the whole point. “I actually think that law enforcement should be difficult,” Marlinspike says, looking calmly out at the crowd. “And I think it should actually be possible to break the law.”

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-07-24

Nothing To Do With Arbroath: Motorist led police on hour-long high-speed chase because he was bored McNalley didn’t appear to be impaired by drugs or alcohol, Odegaard said. “He said he was just bored,” Odegaard said. “It looks like to us right now … he instigated this pursuit because he was bored and just wanted to do it.” The Journalist-Engineer — Medium This example is different. It’s a well-designed data dump. It’s raw numbers without any abstractions. There’s no attachment to the news cycle. There’s no traditional thesis. It cannot be made in Photoshop or Illustrator. You must write software. It represents the present-day revolution within news organizations. Some call it data journalism. Or explorable explanations. Or interactive storytelling. Whatever the label, it’s a huge shift from ledes and infographics.

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-07-17

The “Jennifer Aniston neuron” is the foundation of compelling new memory research — Quartz “We have a relatively limited memory capacity and that much of our perception of our memory is in fact an illusion.” ” Looking for the areas of the brain that cause epileptic seizures, Quiroga discovered that one subject had a neuron that steadily fired whenever she was shown a photo of Jennifer Aniston. It didn’t fire for other celebrities, but seemed linked to the concept of Jennifer Aniston. Another subject had a Halle Berry neuron, and another had one that fired in response to Bill Clinton.” The Suit That Couldn’t Be Copied – The New Yorker Among the interesting things about Savile Row is that the people who work there have complete confidence that what they do is genuinely different and better than what other people can do. They appear to invite scrutiny, arguing that when their work is examined, it will be found admirable. Not only did Taub say yes; he also offered to give me a garment, so that it could be taken apart and so that the tailor who was trying to reproduce it would have the best possible information. His reasoning was that something made by Gieves & Hawkes could be taken apart but not put back together again in as lovely […]

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Weekly Web Harvest for 2016-07-17

The “Jennifer Aniston neuron” is the foundation of compelling new memory research — Quartz “We have a relatively limited memory capacity and that much of our perception of our memory is in fact an illusion.” ” Looking for the areas of the brain that cause epileptic seizures, Quiroga discovered that one subject had a neuron that steadily fired whenever she was shown a photo of Jennifer Aniston. It didn’t fire for other celebrities, but seemed linked to the concept of Jennifer Aniston. Another subject had a Halle Berry neuron, and another had one that fired in response to Bill Clinton.” The Suit That Couldn’t Be Copied – The New Yorker Among the interesting things about Savile Row is that the people who work there have complete confidence that what they do is genuinely different and better than what other people can do. They appear to invite scrutiny, arguing that when their work is examined, it will be found admirable. Not only did Taub say yes; he also offered to give me a garment, so that it could be taken apart and so that the tailor who was trying to reproduce it would have the best possible information. His reasoning was that something made by Gieves & Hawkes could be taken apart but not put back together again in as lovely […]