Flags and Pie Charts

This might be the visual link some students need to start seeing how pie charts reflect real data and it’s not a bad way to get some exposure to the flags of other nations. Basically, the pie chart is shown with the proportional slices for the colors of the flag. You click on the pie chart and it shows you the actual flag. It’s an instant way to make pie charts concrete. A neat idea and something you might have the kids create for other things. You could have them do something similar for paintings, clothing (high fashion or sports uniforms), certain album covers etc. It wouldn’t be great if you were stressing exactness but for getting the general concept down in a fun way it’d work well. Found via Digg

Open Cola for Science Experiments

I saw a post on BoingBoing about the Open Cola project. To me it looks like the perfect combination of a science project and a way to delve into some health topics related to soft drinks. It’s probably a high school level project as some of the ingredients can burn skin (which is kind of odd). You end up with a real world product that kids would be excited to make the option to experiment with different concentrations of flavor a way to start talking about how much sugar is in the cokes they’re drinking you could also do some taste testing based on the experiments in different concentrations and then you’ve got some statistics to go over

Copyright

I have some how found myself on our district’s copyright committee and we’re redesigning our whole course for teachers. It’s been pretty interesting and I only occasionally want to kill myself. Luckily, I’m with a bunch of ninja librarian copyright experts who are handling all the heavy lifting while I make jokes. The site is up here (but not finished) if you’re interested. There are some odd comic style scenarios I’m making as well. They are at least marginally funny although I realize I have a Comic Life addiction but I’m seeking help. Click to enlarge

Mouse Party Drug Animations

Our Byrd M.S. PhysEd teachers lead an amazing unit about drugs and drug abuse. The students research a drug and create a Keynote to be presented in front of class as a culminating project. The other day I found Mouse Party and thought of our brave PhysEd department. This is a great interactive site with simple and quality animations that show how a variety of drugs interact with your brain. If you’re responsible for drug education at your school, Mouse Party could be an interesting way to teach the science behind a “high”.

Greek Gods Sell Out

A wonderful English teacher (soon to be librarian) at my school, Mrs. Clark, is combining Greek gods and advertising techniques for a final project. Essentially, the gods will be shilling for various products related to their divine powers. I made up some sample ads for her using Garageband and Comic Life (the kids don’t have it but we make do with Word). The samples, which are based on student work in previous years, are below if you can find a use for them. Oddly, I did something similar when I taught. The focus was on advertising the gods though and the students were the ad executives. The kids got this intro- The gods on Mount Olympus are a conceited bunch. They have each hired an advertising executive (that’s you) to create a full-page newspaper ad to publicize their talents and abilities. The gods are also a vengeful bunch. If you don’t make your god appear to be the most exciting and intriguing god of all, you might end up in Hades or pushing a stone up a hill for eternity. However, if you do a good job, you could end up vacationing on Mount Olympus and having ambrosia for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. It went well and they liked it. It’d be a fun project to do now with the […]

Google Timeline

A really amazing looking tool from Google with some interesting educational potential. It’s worth checking out. Found via Digg.

Millenial/Zombie Horde Mash Up

>>>>Edit- I added a page and fixed the spelling of millennials (doh!- thanks Greg) I’m working on an Internet safety overview for teachers in our county. I want it to be fun and entertaining but still get the message across. I also have to give a brief overview of the idea of millennials (which feels a little played out to me but that may be because I read too many edtech blogs). So I’m thinking of going the zombie route for the millennials intro. It kind of works if you think about it and I’ll redeem them in the end (I promise) but I thought it might be a fun way to go about this. Check out the quick intro below and let me know what you think. I’ve been known to go overboard. Is this too much? Click on the image for a large view. Click on the image for a large view.

Whirligig on MyMaps

I’m working on do something similar to the awesome work over at Google Lit Trips using Google’s myMaps. The novel is Whirligig by Paul Fleischman- very powerful book that’s a quick read. It’s a great novel for this type of project (fiction but almost all real locations). The main character travels to the four corners of the U.S. (on a Greyhound Bus) as an act of atonement for killing a young girl in a DUI accident. I’ve got the main locations mapped (some real specific information in Chicago) as well as most of the route. It will continue to expand as the students progress through the novel. Check it out if you’re interested. I’ll take requests as well, so let me know if you feel something is missing. Now, what makes this useful? I figure you’ve got two options. You use it as a ancillary material to help get the students more involved in the novel. Let them explore the map and get them involved in explaining things and interacting with the information- otherwise it’s just a fancy map. You have the students add the information for the placemarks in Google Earth. Let them decide what is important at each location and

Muppets and the Computer…

This has touched my “inner-geek” and forced me to find out how much the first season of The Muppet Show would set me back. Within the range of possibility… YouTube BT (warning: 5 min/9.7MB) via BoingBoing