A screenshot of Chrome with the developer tools open and the Elements tab selected. A search for .jam-frame-active is shown with the contextual menu showing to allowing copying of the element.

Get your Jamboard text

We’re doing some strategic planning in Google’s Jamboard. I find it good for the live/interactive aspects of the conversation but when I was looking back over it, it was hard for me to read and organize in my head. I decided I wanted the text from the various sticky notes in a spreadsheet so that I could think about them in different ways. Jamboard doesn’t seem to have any way to interact with it via Google Script or the normal routes I’d pursue. Let’s also pretend that I noticed the “export as PDF” option earlier and rejected it because it was image based. What am I looking for? First, I opened the Developer Tools manually (right click won’t work in these javascript appy things). I looked around a bit in the soup that is the HTML for the page. Eventually I saw the ‘jam-postit-element’ class was associated with the things I wanted. I also saw that the active board would be in the div with ‘jam-frame-active’. Quick and easy Because I’m just doing a quick thing, I don’t really have to make a robust magical unicorn. I just need the simplest path to my destination. Grab the data I navigate to the board I want. I used the developer tools to search for .jam-frame-active and I right click and copy […]

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Critical Digital Fluency Revisited

I had the chance to talk to the kind folks from Middlebury about digital fluency Friday. I’ll probably do a better job getting into the depth of things with this as I was moving pretty rapidly for the 20 minute presentation. It’s also super-meta in a way that’s hard to articulate verbally so I’m going to try to use digital elements to allow that to surface more obviously. You can view the original presentation in the reveal.js framework here.1 I thought this was funny. I considered translating it to French to further emphasize the “this is not a pipe” thing but after surveying a few people in the office I became less confident anyone would know what I was talking about and I would have to rely on Google Translate for the French which seemed risky given Middelbury’s language focus. Part of what I wonder, now even more than a few years ago, is what people are thinking when they talk about digital fluency. There’s just so much there and it’s so entwined with so many other things. My goal was to have people vote on a 1-5 scale on how complex an example of digital fluency by holding up their fingers. That didn’t work to well because Zoom doesn’t let you do the gallery view of participants when you […]

Thinking About Digital Literacy

I was asked to speak at the VCU School of Education’s Teaching Literacy in a Digital World Conference this past Saturday. I’ve haven’t spent much time thinking about “digital literacy” in the past few years. It’s been somewhat mashed together with other terms that overlap like- digital fluency, computational thinking, etc. – and like those terms there’s not much agreement on what it is. I glanced at a few definitions prior to making this but didn’t really stick with one. When Dr. Leila Christenbury started the conference she referenced the “find, evaluate, utilize, share, and create content using information technologies and the Internet” definition of digital literacy so I added that while I waited and it makes as good a framework as anything else. A chunk of the presentation is on GitHub hereĀ or you can fork it here. I opted to do the presentation with reveal.js and on GitHub mainly because I need to be expanding my own competencies (digital and otherwise). I struck the “differently” portion because I wanted to orient things more towards the idea of doing things and didn’t want people getting caught up in the nuances of whether it was really “different.” This was an attempt to connect with the audience. I believed they were mainly k12 teachers or faculty in the School of Ed (who […]